Board members

Stephen Gough

Associate Professor Stephen Gough ASM

Chair and practitioner member from Queensland

Stephen is a career paramedic and senior executive who has worked in the ambulance and health sectors for almost four decades. He has worked in four ambulance services across the states and territories, holding a variety of senior positions in line operations, education, staff development, communications, strategy and other areas of corporate management. He holds a range of tertiary credentials and has been clinically qualified at both advanced life support and intensive care levels.

Stephen is currently the Assistant Commissioner, Capability and Development within the Queensland Ambulance Service and holds Associate Professor appointments at four Australian Universities.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

I have a passion for the development of the paramedic profession and health service delivery models, innovation and change, particularly in the enhancement of the provision of health services to rural Australians. In my role as a health leader, my experience has included: policy, planning, resourcing; clinical practice redesign, clinical workforce education and training, organisational redesign, leadership and health service governance, management capability and development, organisational change and the development of professional practice standards.

I have had the privilege of representing ambulance services and the paramedic profession nationally in various roles including as the Secretary of the Council of Ambulance Authorities (CAA), Executive Board Member of the Australian National Rural Health Alliance, Chair of CAA National Ambulance Education Committee, Director of the CAA Paramedic Education Programs Accreditation Scheme (PEPAS) and several ministerial committee appointments.

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

The paramedic profession has seen monumental change in practice over recent decades and now has a comprehensive set of skills and technologies to provide world class services to Australian communities. The next three years will present equally exciting changes alongside regulation of the profession and the registration of paramedics. Paramedics will work closely with their health practitioner colleagues in evolving roles to meet the increasing demand for health services, seeking innovation and new pathways in providing quality healthcare. Registration will ensure that Australian communities can be confident that expected standards are being met by those practising as paramedic health care professionals.


Note: The Ambulance Service Medal is awarded under the Australian Honours and Awards system for distinguished service as a member of an Australian ambulance service.

Clare Beech

Ms Clare Beech

Practitioner member from New South Wales

After graduating from Charles Sturt University with a Bachelor of Clinical Practice (Paramedic), Clare started her paramedic career as a graduate with Rural Ambulance Victoria in 2002. She spent a number of years working in rural and remote locations in country Victoria before relocating to Melbourne to practise as an Advanced Life Support (ALS) paramedic. In 2007 she worked as a paramedic with NSW Ambulance and has since achieved intensive care, extended care and frontline management qualifications. She has a Postgraduate Certificate in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Leadership and Management and recently attained a Master of Business Leadership. She has also been a Director on the Board of the Australian and New Zealand College of Paramedicine since 2013 and has contributed to the college's advocacy for paramedic registration under AHPRA and the National Scheme.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

I have held senior leadership roles since 2012 and remain unreservedly committed to ensuring excellence in clinical care within the industry. I feel privileged to be a part of the first Paramedicine Board of Australia and look forward to helping with the introduction of national standards for paramedic registration. With plenty of work to do in the next 12 months I am very much looking forward to the momentous occasion of the beginning of paramedic regulation in late 2018.

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

Our profession has a proud history of moving with the times, advancing in line with evidence and being adaptable and innovative in order to deliver care to patients no matter the challenges we face. The National Registration and Accreditation Scheme (the National Scheme) will strengthen our workforce and put patient safety first.

Keith Driscoll

Mr Keith Driscoll ASM

Practitioner member from South Australia

Keith has over 25 years’ experience in the provision of ambulance services through St John Volunteers Northern Territory, Ambulance Service New South Wales and the South Australian Ambulance Service (SAAS). He has performed various roles over the years, including: volunteer ambulance officer, intensive care paramedic, operations director and is currently the Executive Director of Clinical Performance and Patient Safety for SA Ambulance Service.

He was also the first paramedic to become a member of the Medical Advisory Committee (SAAS) and one of the first clinical managers to join the original Medical Directors' Committee of the Council of Ambulance Authorities.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

Over the years I’ve been exposed to many different ambulance services in Australia and around the world and have experience working in a variety of settings that paramedics operate in. I have a strong understanding of governance and patient/public safety. In my role with SAAS, some of my key achievements have been: introducing re-accreditation as a quality assurance activity, leading the single Paramedic Response and Intervention units (including pushbikes and motorbikes), as well as directing state-wide emergency operations. I was also responsible for the development and implementation of the Clinical and Patient Safety directorate. This relatively new department has the role of ensuring patient safety and improving clinical outcomes.

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

I believe paramedicine as a profession will see current roles expand to become less traditional in the future, as well as increasing scopes of practice. This will create a stronger need for those practising in the profession to ensure they have met registration requirements, so the patients can feel safe and have confidence in the clinician treating them. More and more the adaptive clinical skills of the paramedic are being sought in a range of roles with increased autonomy under less structured supervision. It is vital that the public is protected in this space with a sound framework of registration.

Ian Patrick

Associate Professor Ian Patrick ASM

Practitioner member from Victoria

Ian has over 40 years experience as a paramedic and in service development in many roles in Victoria and overseas. He has extensive senior management, board and governance experience including nine years as Chair of the Paramedics Australasia Board and serving on state and not-for-profit committees.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

I am passionate about seeing evidence-driven, patient-centred outcomes, delivered through professional and skilled paramedics - this is central to everything I do.

Previously, I have been responsible for developing strategy and policy initiatives and paramedic education, including course development and accreditation requirements.

I also have senior management and leadership experience and enjoy communicating effectively and developing respectful relationships with all the stakeholders I have worked with, including government bodies, unions, hospitals and the community.

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

I think the profession will gain better acceptance as health professionals which will hopefully mean inclusion in national health planning. This means improved community trust / confidence in care provided by paramedics, not just ambulance services.

Paramedic skills can be deployed in broader independent community health roles, if they are the most appropriate health professional in their community to meet current demands and improve access and equity. This will improve economy, efficiency and effectiveness through paramedic employment mobility.

Angela Wright

Ms Angela Wright

Practitioner member from Western Australia

Angela has worked for St John Ambulance (St John) for over 13 years, starting out as a paramedic and then moving into various management roles across the organisation. Currently Angela is the Operations Manager for the Health Services Directorate at St John. Before this, she completed her B.Sc (Hons) and worked in the mining industry as a geologist and decided to change her career after becoming a volunteer ambulance officer in the outback town of Leinster, in Western Australia.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

My core skills lie in problem solving, process improvement, leading teams and developing and implementing projects. After working as a paramedic and in various management roles at St John, I have a strong focus on patient care and health outcomes within Australia. 

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

Introduction of registration will provide an opportunity for increased accountability and professionalism for the industry, benefiting the public with an improved paramedic service and better consistency of clinical care throughout Australia.

Howard Wren

Mr Howard Wren ASM

Practitioner member from a small jurisdiction - Australian Capital Territory (ACT)

Howard has over 40 years' of experience as a paramedic and registered nurse and is firmly committed to ensuring quality care for patients. He has worked in a wide range of ambulance roles, predominately in education and clinical governance. He is currently the Education Manager for the ACT Ambulance Service.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

My experience has provided me with a sound understanding of the complexities of providing safe and effective patient care in the unique and demanding out-of-hospital environment. In addition, my involvement in the accreditation of tertiary paramedic programs has given me the opportunity to gain insight into the processes for development of our future paramedics. 

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

The paramedic profession faces the challenges of an evolving role in addressing primary health care needs while at the same time still providing quality emergency care for our patients in times of acute illness or injury. In the near future paramedics will practise in a broader setting than has been traditional.

Carol Bennett

Ms Carol Bennett

Community member

Over the last two decades, Carol has worked at senior executive levels in national health and aged care organisations and has served on national and international boards and advisory groups.

She is currently the CEO of Painaustralia, and formerly National CEO of Alzheimer’s Australia, Consumers Health Forum of AustraliaRural Health Workforce Australia and the Victorian Alcohol and Drug Association. She has also managed her own consulting business working with national peak groups and is a current member of the Medicines Australia Advisory Council and Lifeline Canberra.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

I am lucky to have had some experience of the ACT Ambulance Service paramedics while interim CEO and Trustee of the ACT SouthCare Rescue Helicopter Fund

As a community member with many years of experience in health and aged care sectors, I am keen to work with the Board to develop a shared understanding of the factors that can improve and support the quality of care that the profession provides and the people in need of emergency healthcare, wherever they may live in Australia.

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

The paramedic profession will be nationally registered and accredited throughout Australia, ensuring that there are agreed and consistent professional standards in place. This will have a significant outcome for protecting the public interest by ensuring quality practice occurs regardless of location.

Jeanette Barker

Ms Jeanette Barker

Community member

Jeanette is a former member of the NSW Government's senior executive service. For 10 of those years she worked for NSW Health agencies.

Since retiring from full-time work she has remained involved in healthcare and is a member on numerous health-related committees. As a carer for aged parents and relatives, Jeanette has also experienced health as a consumer.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

I bring a wealth of knowledge in healthcare policy and delivery to the Board. My particular areas of expertise are risk and governance, regulation (particularly of health professionals), probity, government relations and health policy.

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

National registration has afforded practitioners mobility across states and territories and in the next three years paramedics and the profession will be able to share in the benefits this creates. A paramedic registered in Australia will be able to work in any state or territory. All Australian paramedics, no matter where they work, will be required to meet the same registration criteria and will be held accountable to the same standards. This establishes the level of competence expected of the paramedicine profession in Australia. It raises the bar for individual practitioners, enhances the reputation of the profession and contributes to protection of the public.

Lynda Renouf

Ms Linda Renouf

Community member

Linda has extensive experience in policy within state and federal government and roles within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service in Queensland and Western Australia. She holds degrees in Law, Southern Cross University, Grad Dip Legal Practice, Australian National University, Master of Law from Australian National University and is currently a PhD (Law) Candidate, Queensland University of Technology. She is also admitted to the Supreme Court of Queensland, and is currently an appointed Member of the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT), former Conciliator at Fair Work Commission, and Principal Policy Advisory, Queensland State Government peak advisory body. Linda is also appointed as community member to the Queensland Board of the Psychology Board of Australia.

What skills and experience do you bring to the Board?

I contribute my legal knowledge and policy-related skills to help in the development of our governing framework under the National Scheme and look forward to working collaboratively with paramedics, AHPRA and my colleagues on the National Board.

Where do you think the paramedicine profession will be in three years and what do you think this means for protection of the public?

The most exciting thing about paramedicine joining the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme in 2018 is that this process is a collaborative approach which allows paramedics to be formally recognised at a national level in line with the other health professions. The registration of paramedics acknowledges the important role they provide in the area of emergency care, while affording the public transparency regarding individual registrations. This will ensure all paramedics are suitably accredited and, that our industry grows competently and ethically allowing the public to have more confidence in the protection afforded under the National Scheme.

 
 
Page reviewed 3/11/2017