FAQ: Grandparenting registration standard

The Grandparenting registration standard provides a time-limited opportunity for paramedics who do not hold an approved, substantially equivalent or accepted qualification to demonstrate to the Paramedicine Board of Australia (the Board) that they are suitably qualified and competent for general registration as a paramedic.

The Board has considered the grandparenting pathways available under the National Law1 and developed criteria to help paramedics understand the supporting information required (including evidence of qualifications and training) to meet the Board’s expectations for registration. The criteria for each pathway reflect the level and scope of the knowledge and skills for safe practice as a registered paramedic in Australia, including the volume of learning and on-the-job training and/or supervised practice required to develop the necessary knowledge, skills and attributes. The Board’s approach to the grandparenting pathways is designed to ensure that all paramedics who are suitably trained and qualified to practise in a competent and ethical manner are able to be registered.


1The Health Practitioner Regulation National Law, as in force in each state and territory (the National Law).

 

Under the section 311(1)(a) pathway, you are qualified for general registration if the Board considers your qualification or training is adequate for the purposes of practising paramedicine. This is termed the “adequate qualification” pathway. You can qualify through this pathway if your qualification is assessed as meeting all of the following four criteria:

  • the academic level of your qualification is comparable to at least an Australian Bachelor Degree (Australian Qualifications Framework2 Level 7 or higher), and 
  • your qualification enabled you to practise paramedicine in the jurisdiction where your qualification was issued, and 
  • your qualification was issued by an Australian university or another institution with registration/authorisation to deliver higher education, and 
  • the program of study that led to your qualification was subject to external quality assurance and accreditation that was based on published standards and processes and regular review by an individual or team with appropriate expertise in education and in paramedicine.

The Board will publish and maintain a list on its website of qualifications or training it has assessed as meeting all four criteria. This list will be updated as qualifications are bought to the attention of the Board that they determine are ‘adequate’ for registration.


2AQF Qualifications

Section 311(1)(b) pathway provides an opportunity for those who do not hold an accepted, approved, substantially equivalent or adequate qualification, and do not have five years’ experience practising paramedicine, to qualify for registration. You can use a combination of qualifications/training and further study, or a period of supervised practice to demonstrate to the Board that you are suitably qualified and competent for general registration.

You can qualify through this pathway if your qualifications/training/supervised practice is assessed as meeting all of the following four criteria:

  • the academic level of your qualification/training is comparable to at least an Australian Diploma (Australian Qualifications Framework Level 5 or higher), and 
  • your qualification enabled you to practise paramedicine in the jurisdiction where your qualification was issued, and 
  • your qualification was issued by:
    • an Australian Registered Training Organisation, or 
    • an institution with registration/authorisation to deliver training and issue qualifications in paramedicine, and
  • your qualification is on the published list of qualifications/training that the Board has assessed as including 1700 hours of on-the-job supervised practice. Or you can provide evidence you have completed 1700 hours of on-the-job supervised practice as defined3 and the supervision was provided by either a jurisdictional ambulance service or, after participation day, provided by a registered paramedic4.

If your qualifications/training are assessed as meeting the first three criteria only and you cannot provide evidence of on-the-job supervised practice to meet the fourth criterion, you will be given the option to:

  • complete a further period(s) of on-the-job supervised practice that, of itself, or in combination with prior supervised practice, meets criterion 4 and (re)apply for registration before the Grandparenting registration standard ceases, or 
  • successfully complete a Board-approved competence assessment at your own expense before the Grandparenting registration standard ceases.

3Supervised practice, is a mechanism to provide the National Board with the assurance that the supervisee is practising safely, competently and ethically for a range of regulatory purposes. Supervised practice for the purposes of this section is defined as a process that has: a formal, documented agreement between an employer or supervisor that guidance, support and training will be provided when carrying out paramedic practice, the total hours of direct and indirect supervision recorded, the dates and duration of supervision recorded and a documented conclusion, assessment or final sign-off procedure.

4A ‘registered paramedic’ is an individual who holds general registration as a paramedic in Australia.

Section 311(1)(c) pathway provides an opportunity for those who do not hold an accepted, approved, substantially equivalent or adequate qualification to use their experience practising paramedicine to demonstrate to the Board that they are suitably qualified and competent for general registration. This pathway is only available if you can provide a portfolio of verifiable evidence that is assessed as showing that you have practised paramedicine for five years in the past 10 years and that you are currently competent to practise paramedicine. Verifiable evidence means documented information such as, statements of service, descriptions of the roles where you practised paramedicine including hours of work and duties, an authority to practice, letters from employers, satisfactory performance reviews or even a detailed personal submission.

It is important to note:

  • the definition of "practising paramedicine" covers a range of clinical and non-clinical roles 
  • to be assessed as showing you have practised for five years, you would generally be required to submit verifiable evidence of at least 5000 hours of experience practising paramedicine, and 
  • the nature and type of your practice is also relevant, particularly if there is not verifiable evidence of at least 5000 hours of experience practising paramedicine.

If you have not provided sufficient verifiable evidence to satisfy the Board of your competence to practise paramedicine, you may be required to successfully complete a Board-approved competence assessment at your own expense.

 
 
 
Page reviewed 26/06/2018